Talos II: The Science Fiction Theatre Festival of London 2018

Love Scifi? Love Theatre? Then why not visit London’s only SciFi Theatre Festival starting tonight for four nights in Clapham, South London.

​Talos: the Science Fiction Theatre Festival of London is the UK’s first and only sci-fi theatre festival staging science fictional plays from all over the world. After the first festival in 2015, Talos returns to stage even more plays with science fiction and fantasy elements, providing a platform for mind-blowing new writing and testing the boundaries of contemporary theatre. Continue reading

Spectrum: The London Science Fiction & Fantasy Writer’s Group

Spectrum: The London Science Fiction & Fantasy Writer’s GroupSince October 2015 London has a new genera writers group entitled “Spectrum: The London Science Fiction & Fantasy Writer’s Group“. It has actually been meeting for a number of years but recently moved to a new online home where it seems to be going fron strength to strength and now has close to 100 members. Continue reading

UPDATE Jeff Noon Interview to be STREAMED LIVE and at a new BIGGER venue

On Wednesday 27th January 2016 we’ll be trying our best to stream January’s Jeff Noon interview, live online. Between now and then a public domain recording of The Planet’s by Gustav Holst will be playing and we’d like your feedback on it. Just open the link & let us know what you hear.

MP3 audio only
http://bit.ly/JeffNoonJan2016Interview

For the last few months Chad Dixon has been valiantly trying his best to broadcast BSFA interviews with Periscope, it’s a little error prone so if it doesn’t work we’ll just do the audio. Cheers Chad!

Audio and Video – on the night.
https://periscope.tv/BSFA

NEW LOCATION
Due to the popularity of this event we are moving to a new BIGGER venue which luckily is close by. Andrea has surpassed herself finding this venue 🙂

The Reliance, 336 Old Street, EC1V 9DR
MAP LINK: https://goo.gl/maps/cKQsbT9HDE12

Introducing the Aberdeen Science Fiction Book Club

The Aberdeen Science Fiction Book ClubComing up for it’s second birthday Aberdeen.ScienceFictionBookClub.org is starting 2016 in style by meeting to discuss the Iain M. banks classic “The Player of Games” on January 14th 2016.

The Aberdeen Science Fiction Book Club meets on the second Thursday of every month in central Aberdeen and is open to women and men interested in meeting like-minded people with an interest in science-fiction novels and short stories.

Every month they read a book from their reading list, set in advance by their undemocratically chosen Leaders, then meet up to discuss what they liked or disliked about it. Simple. And it’s free!

Location: The Belmont Cinema, 49 Belmont St, Aberdeen AB10 1JS [google maps]

BEST OF BRITISH SF 2015 concludes with Alastair Reynolds, H.G. Wells and Stephen Baxter

The ScienceFictionBookClub.org conclude their 2015 Best of British Season in November with three books:

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FREE TALK: What’s New About the Novum?: SF, History, Temporality.

Dr Caroline Edwards

Dr Caroline Edwards

Join Dr Caroline Edwards for the second seminar in the King’s Fantastic Talks Series, at which she will discuss “What’s New About the Novum?: SF, History, Temporality.”

Where: Room K2.40 Kings College London, Strand Campus
Strand, London WC2R 2LS, London
When: 6:30-8:00, Thursday 29th October 2015

Is her own words….

I’ve been invited this Autumn to deliver a lecture as part of a new series, “King’s Fantastic Talks,” organised by Dr Rhys Williams. My lecture will take place on 29th October at King’s College London’s campus and is titled “What’s New About the Novum? SF, History, Temporality.” The talk builds on my research into Ernst Bloch’s utopian philosophy, looking in particular at the concept of the Novum (literally, the New) which he developed as part of his model of anticipatory consciousness (Vorschein). The Novum was extended by Darko Suvin in his influential formalist study of science fiction, Metamorphoses of Science Fiction: On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre (1979), where Suvin borrowed Bloch’s notion of multi-stranded temporal complexity in his examination of the structural ingreidents of science fiction as a genre. However, Suvin elided the explicitly Messianic framework in which Bloch’s Novum is grounded – derived from the Jewish tradition of redeeming the past, which is informed by complex messianic futurities germinative within the present time.

I will consider the temporal implications of the Blochian Novum (as well as its similarities with Suvin’s later reading) and what this means for our understanding of how the Novum functions in science fiction texts. Whether expressed by a new situation or secondary world, or a de-alienating socio-political perspective in which more egalitarian relations are articulated in a futuristic or fantastical landscape, the Novum should be understood as more than simply “new” narrative actants and settings. Rather, I shall argue, we need to pay attention to the layered temporal possibilities suggested in the structure of the Novum itself: at once anticipatory, utopian, reemptive, messianic, political and subjective.

There’ll be drinks afterwards at a watering hole of our choice.